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Fyrskib XVII

The ship was built in 1895, where it was used as a lighthouse vessel for the first 24 years at Helsingør. After that, it served at Gedser Rev until 1972.
Since then, it has been a museum vessel in different harbors.
Since 2018 it has been back in Helsingør, where it started its service.
In 2003, it went through a major restauration at Hvide Sande Shipyard. In the beginning of 2024 it was towed to Hvide Sande Shipyard once again for further restoration.

History of the lightship XVII

Lightship XVII Gedser Rev has a rich history that spans over more than a century. The ship was built in 1895 at the N.F. Hansen shipyard in Odense and was originally stationed at Lappegrund near the entrance to the Øresund. It served as an important navigation point for ships sailing through the treacherous waters around Gedser Rev, south of Falster – Denmark’s southernmost point.

During World War II, the ship was confiscated by the German occupying forces and moved near Kalundborg but returned to its position at Gedser Rev after the war in 1945.

Throughout the Cold War, Gedser Rev played a role in the escape from East Germany. Many East Germans attempted to flee across the Baltic Sea towards Denmark, and at least 50 were rescued by the lightship.

The lightship was decommissioned in 1972 and was later sold to the A.P. Moller and Wife Chastine Mc-Kinney Møller Foundation, which donated it to the National Museum of Denmark. After extensive restoration completed in 2003 at Hvide Sande Shipyard, the ship was transformed into a museum vessel. It has since been open to the public and has functioned as a living museum, telling the story of Denmark’s maritime past.

In recent times, the ship was moved to Helsingør Harbor, where it is now part of the M/S Maritime Museum. In 2021, the ship received a grant that enabled further restoration, and in the beginning of 2024 it was towed to Hvide Sande Shipyard for this purpose. This ensures that Lightship XVII Gedser Rev will continue to preserve its historical significance and continue to inspire future generations.

Have questions?

Do you want to know more about our expertise in the restoration and maintenance of historic vessels? Feel free to send us your questions and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

    Fionia

    Fionia (the Latin name for Funen, which the ship is now named) was built in 1904.
    It was used as a cargo ship until 1960, before becoming a sea angling ship in Elsinore.
    From 2004 it worked as a daytrip vessel, until the distillery in Nyborg bought it in 2012. Since 2023, the USTC Group in Middelfart has been the proud owner of the ship.
    At our shipyard, we have had the pleasure of taking care of the maintenance since 2005.
    Many jobs have been done in order to keep the ship in good shape.

    Fulton

    The National Museum of Denmark and Hvide Sande Shipyard have been working together for more than three decades to maintain the historic schooner Fulton af Marstal.

    The partnership was initiated in the winter of 1991/92 when the National Museum of Denmark, which owns the 1915 schooner, and the Fulton Foundation were looking for a shipyard capable of restoring and maintaining wooden ships.

    Fulton restoration and maintenance

    Preserving maritime heritage

    Each year, when Fulton af Marstal begins her annual maintenance ritual at Hvide Sande Shipyard, the partnership is a testament to the mutual trust and dedication between the ship’s crew and the shipyard’s craftsmen.

    After more than 30 years of cooperation, we are still proud to be a part of preserving the maritime heritage that inspires future endeavors in shipbuilding and restoration.

    Restoration and routine maintenance

    Restoration work, such as straightening the keel, replacing frames and cladding, helps Hvide Sande Shipyard gain detailed knowledge of the ship’s structure, form, special boatbuilding techniques and solutions typical of the period and type.

    All maintenance work on the schooner Fulton has been carefully planned and carried out without interrupting the schooner’s service.

    Over the years, routine maintenance such as hull repairs, frame replacements, and sheathing installations have not only preserved the vessel, but also enriched our knowledge base of traditional shipbuilding techniques.

    This meticulous approach, guided by a shared commitment to preserving the ship’s authenticity while adapting to modern operational requirements, has fostered a fruitful collaboration.

    Fulton of Marstal

    Seamless coordination

    Captain Jakob Jensen, who celebrated his 20th anniversary as skipper in 2022, testifies to the seamless coordination between Fulton’s crew and the shipyard, praising our ability to address maintenance needs promptly to ensure that Fulton’s service was not interrupted.

    Shipyard CEO Carl Erik Kristensen echoes these sentiments, fondly recalling the hard but rewarding work carried out during the cold winters.

    Fulton history

    The schooner Fulton was built in 1915 in Marstal on the island of Ærø and originally sailed around most of Europe carrying salted cod.

    Fulton’s historical significance extends beyond her maritime heritage; since the 1970s she has served as a training ship for troubled young people, helping them to find a good direction in life.

    Today, Fulton remains true to her heritage, serving as a charter vessel and inviting school groups to experience the charm of traditional sailing.

    Learn more about Fulton af Marstal at the official Fulton homepage and at the National Museum of Denmark.

    Need help?

    Do you want to know more about our expertise in the restoration and maintenance of historic vessels? Feel free to send us your questions and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

      Esvagt Wind – a great cooperation between shipping company and shipyard

      Between 2019 and 2021, Hvide Sande Shipyard has built 5 STBs (Safe Transfer Boats) for the Esbjerg-based shipping company Esvagt, which provides safety and service at sea.

      The STBs ESVAGT WIND 5-6-7-8-9 are 12 meter long vessels with aluminum hulls. With a crew of two boatmen, they can transport 8 service technicians and carry approx. 1 ton of spare parts for offshore installations in the North Sea and adjacent waters. They are launched up to 10 times a day from a davit crane arrangement on larger SOV motherships, but can also operate independently in and out of port. They are certified for a range of 200 nautical miles.

      Powered by two Volvo Penta D6 engines, the vessels operate at speeds of up to 30 knots. It is a highly effective vessel that meets – and in many cases exceeds – customer expectations in terms of efficiency, versatility and reliability. Esvagt was responsible for the design, construction and specifications. The company also maintains the vessels.

      Bjarne Mikkelsen, Senior Service Manager at Esvagt, explains the cooperation with Hvide Sande Shipyard:

      CEO Carl Erik Kristensen visited us at the start of the project and looke

      When we started the STB 12 project in 2014, 3D drawing technology was not as developed. So we built a full-size mock-up and moved the components around until everything worked optimally. For the construction of ships no. 5 – 9, we chose Hvide Sande Shipyard. We deliberately chose a Danish supplier in order to preserve Danish jobs.

      CEO Carl Erik Kristensen visited us at the beginning of the project to have a look at a similar vessel. After a quarter of an hour, he was able to confirm that Hvide Sande Shipyard was capable of building such a vessel and gave us an approximate price. It added up!

      Naturally, we were a little hesitant to start the process with a new supplier. But it turned out to be a fantastic collaboration. I had a goal that we would be as good friends and business partners at the end of the project as we were at the beginning – and it came true.

      At Esvagt we never compromise when it comes to safety and quality. We knew that Hvide Sande Shipyard could deliver and that their organization and documentation processes are in place.

      I know many of the employees from different contexts, and Hvide Sande Shipyard has always delivered good quality on time. All challenges along the way were solved in the best possible way.

      Even if it is not meticulously written, Hvide Sande Shipyard always fulfills an agreement.”

      Nordwind

      LOA – 26,9 m

      Beam – 6,5 m

      Disp. – 110 t

      Sail area – 165,8 m2

      SSB Nordwind was laid down as an armed fishing vessel in 1945 and completed as a Bermuda rigged ketch by the British Occupying Forces in 1948. She served as a coastal patrol vessel, before being transferred to sail training activities for the West German Bundesmarine, a role she has fulfilled from 1956 to 2006. The Deutsches Marinemuseum in Wilhelmshaven acquired her in 2008, and since then she has provided daysails for up to 35 guests, as well as taking up to 10 guests on longer trips. She has also participated in various events such as Kieler Woche and Jade Cup.

      Arriving at Hvide Sande Shipyard in late 2021, Nordwind has been the subject of considerable renovation. Her stem has been replaced and large amounts of her oak planking renewed as well as surface treatment of her steel frames, beam shelves deck beams and stringers. She has been fitted with a new watertight bulkhead, an electric bow thruster, hydraulic steering equipment and new generator unit. Furthermore, her weather deck (previously a patchwork of larch, oak, plywood, fiberglass and teak) has been replaced with one of traditionally laid pine. She has also been sheathed in copper plating below the waterline to minimize marine growth.

      NB 145 – Grotte

      Information

      Vessel typeFerry
      Vessel nameGrotte
      DeliverySeptember, 2021
      DescriptionOur first full electric project (after 5 hybrid projects). Built for passenger and car transfer between Esbjerg – Fanø.
      Hull materialSteel
      Tonnage925 GT
      Length over all49,90 meter
      Breadth beam13,80 meter
      Depth2,40 meter
      Passengers303 pax. 23 cars and 4 trucks
      Main engines2x 375kW Danfoss
      ESU (Batteries)1107 kWh, Hybrid
      Aux. Engine453 kWe. Scania
      Speed(knots)11 knots
      Propulsion2 pcs. Schottel STP190 FP (375kW)
      ClassificationBureau Veritas
      Other equipmentAvailable

      Images

      NB 144 – Esvagt Wind 9

      Information

      Vessel typeCrew transfer vessel
      Vessel nameEsvagt Wind 9
      Delivery2021
      DescriptionThe STB (Safe transfer boat) will be launche from a lager mother ship
      Hull materialAluminium
      Tonnage7,7 GT
      Length over all12,35 meter
      Breadth beam3,69 meter
      Depth1,15 meter
      Passengers2 Crew / 8 Technicians
      Main engines2 pcs. Volvo Penta D6 330BHP
      Aux. EngineN/A
      Speed30 knots
      PropulsionVolvo IPS 450 Duoprop
      ClassificationBureau Veritas
      Other equipmentHenriksen hook

      Images

      NB 142 – Esvagt Wind 8

      Information

      Vessel typeCrew transfer vessel
      Vessel nameEsvagt Wind 8
      Delivery2020
      DescriptionThe STB (Safe transfer boat) will be launche from a lager mother ship
      Hull materialAluminium
      Tonnage7,7 GT
      Length over all12,35 meter
      Breadth beam3,69 meter
      Depth1,15 meter
      Passengers2 Crew / 8 Technicians
      Main engines2 pcs. Volvo Penta D6 330BHP
      Aux. EngineN/A
      Speed30 knots
      PropulsionVolvo IPS 450 Duoprop
      ClassificationBureau Veritas
      Other equipmentHenriksen hook

      Images

      NB 141 – Esvagt Wind 7

      Information

      Vessel typeCrew transfer vessel
      Vessel nameEsvagt Wind 7
      Delivery2020
      DescriptionThe STB (Safe transfer boat) will be launche from a lager mother ship
      Hull materialAluminium
      Tonnage7,7 GT
      Length over all12,35 meter
      Breadth beam3,69 meter
      Depth1,15 meter
      Passengers2 Crew / 8 Technicians
      Main engines2 pcs. Volvo Penta D6 330BHP
      Aux. EngineN/A
      Speed30 knots
      PropulsionVolvo IPS 450 Duoprop
      ClassificationBureau Veritas
      Other equipmentHenriksen hook

      Images

      Elbe no. 5

      The German schooner, built in Hamburg in 1883, underwent major restoration in the winter of 2018/2019, and had major damage repaired in the winter of 2019/2020.

      Elbe no. 5, which originally served as a pilot boat at the entrance to Hamburg and was since owned by various private individuals around the world, has returned to the port of Hamburg.

      The new circle of owners in Hamburg has ordered the restoration of the schooner at Hvide Sande Shipyard, where it has had more than 100 frames replaced, each designed according to their own template, as well as over 1250 metres of cladding. The schooner has also received a completely new keel, and all work has been done in oak specifically purchased and stored for the task.

      In the winter of 2019/2020, Elbe no. 5 had major damage repaired after a collision and is now back in Hamburg where the owners are finalising equipment of the schooner.

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